Starting a Program

Starting a Summer Meal Program

Check out this fact sheet from the USDA on how to participate in the At-Risk Afterschool Meals component of CACFP or this fact sheet from FRAC on how the program works.

Responsibilities of summer program providers:

  • Serve meals to all needy children 18 years of age and under
  • Serve meals that meet the minimum meal pattern requirements
  • Count meals as they are served to children
  • Provide adequate supervision during the meal service
  • Ensure that children eat all meals onsite
  • Maintain and promptly submit reports and records that the CE requires
  • Report to the CE any changes in the number of meals required as attendance fluctuates
  • Report any other problems regarding the meal services
  • Comply with civil rights laws and regulations
  • Adhere to local health and sanitation regulations
  • Attend CE training sessions

Review the Texas Department of Agriculture Summer Meals Toolkit or the Food Research & Action center’s implementation calendar and guide to learn how to start an afterschool meal program and increase participation.

Find suggestions for best practices through the USDA or FRAC.

Looking for menu ideas? Check out these ideas from FRAC or the USDA.

Find a sponsor here to work on starting a program.

Have questions? The USDA and FRAC have some answers to frequently asked questions.

Check out this video by the USDA to find out what it means to be a feeding site.

 

Starting an Afterschool Meal Program

Afterschool programs that operate in low-income areas may be eligible to participate in the At-Risk Care Center component of the Child and Adult Care Food Program to serve afterschool meals at no cost to children or providers.

Check out this fact sheet from the USDA on how to participate in the At-Risk Afterschool Meals component of CACFP or this fact sheet from FRAC on how the program works.

Responsibilities of afterschool program providers: (double check these w/ TDA standards)

  • Provide school-aged children with enrichment programming outside of school hours
  • Be located in an area where the majority of students at the local public school receive free or reduced price meal benefits
  • Be non-profit with proof of 501c-3 status
  • Have at least 30 children in attendance everyday
  • Have refrigeration (and heating equipment, if necessary) for at least 2 days worth of meals
  • Attend an annual training at NDS
  • Maintain monthly paperwork

Review the Texas Department of Agriculture manual for At-Risk Afterschool Handbook or the Food Research & Action center’s manual for providers to learn how to start an afterschool meal program and increase participation.

Find suggestions for best practices through the USDAFRAC, or No Kid Hungry.

Looking for menu ideas? Check out these ideas from FRAC or the USDA.

Connect with these sponsors to work on starting a program:

Have questions? The USDA and FRAC have some answers to frequently asked questions.

Learn about the difference between at-risk afterschool programs and summer meal programs through this chart.